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    The Doctor is In: Your Host

    Disclaimer: Not an actual Dr.
    Hi, I’m Ruth Fink-Winter. I have a Master’s degree in engineering, a funny name, and a serious interest in Rocky Horror. Combine that with mild obsessive tendencies and you have a good title for a webpage. That occasionally gets hits from people trolling for porn.

    Rocky Horror History

    I’ve been a fan of the Rocky Horror Picture Show since 1987, when I started performing in Lincoln, Nebraska. Since then I’ve performed in casts in California, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, South Carolina, and back in Nebraska. My husband and I met at the show, got engaged there, and spent our wedding night there. We perform with a cast in greater Chicagoland. I’ve been fortunate enough to see the film across the US and occasionally outside it. I also enjoy the play.

    Ruth with the Rocky Shorts at the Myrtle Beach Hard Rock (no longer there)

    Ruth with the Rocky Shorts at the Myrtle Beach Hard Rock (they’re no longer there)

    I play Magenta, whose voice I fell in love with in 1978, and occasionally the Usherette (Trixie). I’ve served as a costume judge at the Anaheim con in California (1997), the NYC con (1998), Denver Rocks the Rockies (1999), Transylvania ’99, East Coast 2000 (Allentown), Bay Area 2000, the 25th Anniversary (Las Vegas, 2000), the Philadelphia Con (2002), The Denton Affair (Manchester, UK, 2006) the Untoucha-Touchables Con (Chicago, 2006), the 35th Anniversary (LA, 2010) and RKO Con (Providence, 2013). I was honored to receive the BOSS award in April 1998 at the NYC con for my contributions to the Rocky Horror Internet community, and to receive a Fan Award from Sal Piro at the 25th Anniversary. I was interviewed on the BBC World Service radio program “Outlook” for the Rocky Horror Show’s 30th anniversary. I received a “David” statuette at the 2001 Frankie Goes to Hollywood convention (the “Golden Sphincter” award–hmm).

    Scaring the natives with Midnight Madness (photo by George)

    Scaring the natives with Midnight Madness (photo by George)


    Other Rocky-related sites I maintain include Rockypedia.org, which used to be the Rocky Horror Frequently Asked Questions list, and the website for defunct national Rocky Horror fanzine Crazed Imaginations, which I edited from 1998-2006. I contribute to Rockyhorror.org and Rockyhorror.org’s Facebook page, in addition to providing content to bios for Rockyhorror.com and occasional contributions to RockyHorrorWiki.org . I also run cast Completely Crazy’s website and Facebook page, in addition to various other social media.

    Interests include collecting Rocky Horror items, foreign languages, vegetarian cooking, gardening, history and art.

    On the pole with Completely Crazy (photo: Susan Smith)

    On the pole with Completely Crazy (photo: Susan Smith)

    ID’ing the Dr.

    If you meet me at a con, I’ll be the person who looks like she doesn’t belong there, probably wearing jeans and a T-shirt, no makeup, with my hair in a ponytail.
    Just like internet dating site pictures, photos are kind of old; I’m a little grayer now.

    Do I Make My Own Costumes?
    Mostly. Almost anyone can learn to sew (I did!), but I now have more money than time. My most recent Magenta costume pieces were made in 2011; the oldest were made in 1991, and I wear the butcher apron I stole from my mother’s kitchen drawer in 1987 for Lab Scene. In 2001 I bought a costume for the first time but did some of the work as well as final alterations. Since then I’ve commissioned two Magenta dresses and a spacesuit, modifying them to varying degrees. I’m much happier getting creative with cardboard, duct tape and a tube of craft glue than sewing from a pattern. I’d love to buy something I could wear as is, but I’m particular and apparently I have strange measurements. After some bad experiences I usually ask that a tailor make me a muslin before doing the finished piece.

    Creating costumes is a continuous process as your abilities and knowledge of the costumes improve (and the damn things fall apart / get lost). If you can’t make a perfect costume, don’t sit around feeling sorry for yourself — make the best you can, and then make a better one next time. If this means you’re cutting up something you found in a thrift store, great. That’s how most of us got started and it’s the fastest, most fun way to create your first costume. I respect people who put their time, effort and love into their costumes.

    Email me if you want to talk costumes. (If you’re going to ask questions about the Costume List, please do read it first. Thanks.)